Mom’s “Last Stand”

December 13, 2017 Update: I received something called a “Minute Order” from the Federal judge after we filed a summary in October (I ended up in the hospital the day before my summary was due, caused by an apparent stress related MS exacerbation). After the summary was filed, I was originally slated to see the judge November 28th, but they called to tell me about the order the day before court.

I was broken-hearted hearted when the clerk told me to be happy I didn’t have to go all the way down to court; and I explained to him that was what I was waiting for this whole time.

From what I understand this is neither good nor bad, but I am preparing for the worst (it’s easier to say ‘no’ if you don’t see someone, right?). I’m hoping that he is going to be in a really good mood and finally award my money to my family and I… but I’m pretty sure it’s going to take a miracle–the SSA told the judge that they were “done” with me too, so yeah.

My only choice after this is Supreme Court–and another fifteen hundred dollar court bill.

You would think someone would notice how long I have stuck with this… How many frauds or liars would spend nearly a dozen years (and thousands of much needed dollars on doctor, hospital and court bills), just to get a few hundred dollars a month?

Only stubbornness, creativity and luck has barely kept our lives afloat financially since I became ill. We have given up a lot that many take for granted. Thank goodness for the internet.

If you are fighting for Disability, please watch your doctors carefully when they keep records (and make sure they have your back at all times)–your livelihoods literally depend on it.


Things have been pretty crazy in my life lately, but I won’t bore you with all of the little details. Here’s a little what has been going on lately:

When I got out of the hospital last Thanksgiving, I learned that my attorney decided he couldn’t “find any more arguments” about my case and quit. After trying unsuccessfully to find a new attorney willing to help me file “on the federal level”, I have decided to represent myself “Pro Se” and will be filing my own arguments. The only catch is that I have only five days left to file.

fdr-ssaMy husband took me to the Federal building last Friday; and when I told the clerk the reason why I was there, she stopped me and said, “Let me ask you something. Do you feel like your civil rights have been violated?”.

I sat there for a second, tears began to burn in the back of my eyes after hearing her say those words and I thought… Did I? Then it all flooded in… I used to get told that I was “too young” all the time when I made complaints of pain. I was noted by doctors to be everything from “well nourished” to “massively obese”. Even my gender has been an issue… The sad fact is that it’s pretty well known that doctors tend to listen to men’s complaints more attentively than a woman’s, because we’re apparently “too sensitive” when it comes to pain.

(Apparently, the only gender in the world able to push a watermelon through a pinhole–with and without medication–doesn’t truly know what “real pain” is. I’m sorry, but as much as I love my husband, I have seen him when he’s gotten a cold or the flu. If I had a dollar for every time he either told me or our children he was dying–or started to write out his will in his “deathbed”–I’d be a multi-millionaire.)

I never really gave the clerk an answer. She just looked at my face and knew immediately. She handed me a form and said, “You put down here what you just told me and bring it back once you’re done to see if we can file a civil rights action.” She also handed me a flyer for a required legal clinic that I need to attend in order to file “pro se” in order to represent myself.

downloadAll weekend my husband and I had been discussing our plans how to handle next week… and praying that my body won’t give out on me beforehand. On Monday we’ll be driving back to the Federal building to take the course, since I am unable to retain the information on my own. Hopefully after that, it won’t be too hard to write my own legal brief.

I’m not sure what the outcome will be when it’s all said and done. Whatever happens will happen; but not for lack of trying.

The Social Security Administration (and some of the words of ex-doctors) may be able to keep my “benefits” from me; but they won’t ever take my spirit. As long as I have a voice, I’m going to continue to use it so that no one ever has to go through what my family has done for nearly twenty years.

be-the-changeIf there is one thing I want anyone to learn from me, it would probably be this: Your doctor works for YOU. If they don’t do the job that you hired them to do–don’t assume they are trying their best–find a new doctor ASAP. You wouldn’t take your car to a shoddy mechanic, so don’t allow the shoddy physicians of the world keep you from getting your answers.

Wish me (us) luck, and please send your thoughts and prayers our way this week. We could use all the positive energy in the world for what we are about to take on. ((HUGS))

Advertisements

Proper Medical Documentation: Why It’s Important

When I was “younger” I trusted my (ex) doctors were taking care of me for years; until I realized they weren’t actually paying attention to my symptoms–only making assumptions–and not taking proper records. Because of that, I have been fighting for Social Security Disability over ten years later–and I’m guessing I’m going to be denied again this time around (it doesn’t stop hurting after all of these years, you just start getting used to being rejected… Personal tip: Never give up fighting for Disability if you believe you honestly and truly deserve it).

doctor-with-tabletWhether you’re disabled or not, it’s important to make sure that your doctor is documenting your case properly by noting all of your symptoms–including any and all phone calls where you discuss your symptoms (some doctors don’t keep notes of calls with their patients–losing very important information at times). If you doctor isn’t keeping proper records, it could mean longer wait time for a proper diagnosis–and treatment–which could even mean the difference between life and death or disability…

As far as Disability and the Social Security Administration, it doesn’t matter how disabled you are in real life–if it’s not on record and they can’t read how severely ill you truly are, you will not be approved for SSDI. The guidelines are very strict, and interpretation of these records depend on whether you’ll be approved for Social Security or not… Even if you have medical records as tall as you are… if your records don’t detail every symptom, official diagnosis, and the scale of your disability, you will lose YOUR money. Even worse, if you become disabled and still haven’t been diagnosed, you will have no chance at winning your “benefits” if you don’t get your answers before your DLI (Date Last Insured–The SSA’s term for the final day of being “insured”, ie. end of premium date). It doesn’t matter how many times you went to your doctor, or how hard you tried to get them to help you. Your relationship with your doctor, and how they keep record of your illness(es) will be the deciding factor in more ways than one.

Read more about why it’s so important for doctors to take proper records in the article Poor Documentation: Why It Happens & How To Fix It, and what can be done to help create change in the medical field.

It can mean more than just your life, it also means your quality of life/livelihood… Like you don’t have enough problems already, right?

 


Chaos Behind A Smile

I read Susan Williams’ account of her husband, the late Robin Williams’s final months. It’s heartbreaking, yet so familiar at the same time if you live with a chronic illness.

Mr. Williams was a warrior whose mind, body and spirit could take no more. In life, he inspired and filled millions of people with joy and laughter as he performed his many wonderful characters throughout his career. In many ways, his death will have meaning that he probably never anticipated.

66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show
Photo credit: Lester Cohen/Wireimage

Mr. Williams was living with an invisible illness called Lewy Body Dementia, a neurologic condition that causes a form of dementia that creates the same underlying changes in the brain as Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s. He was officially diagnosed postmortem. Even though he succumbed to his illness on his own terms his widow, Susan, explains in detail the journey that led to the final months of his life. She showed how difficult it was for him, and for his family, to go through his journey of confusion, cognitive issues, temporary paralysis and more.

Everything the public never saw.

She showed us, through the eyes of a caregiver, the life of a human being that was living with a debilitating chronic illness.

PLEASE, read Mrs. Williams’ story. I promise, it will open your eyes – and your hearts – to a world that healthy people, luckily, never have to experience.

It will teach you how easily a smile can fool the outside world into believing that a sick person is fine.

Do me a favor. After you read the story, share it with your friends and loved ones. While you’re at it, give them a hug – remember how precious life, and good health, truly is.

Rest in peace, Mr. Williams. Your light will be in our hearts and laughter for eternity.

To learn more about Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), click here.  

To donate to the Lewy Body Dementia Association, click here.

***

Some notable people who suffered from Lewy Body Dementia include:

  • Actress Estelle Getty
  • Music industry icon Casey Kasem
  • Athlete Stan Mikita
  • Artist Don Featherstone, creator of the iconic lawn flamingo
  • Former NBA head coach Jerry Sloan
  • Actor Robin Williams

Summer Treats & Gadgets To Beat The Heat

Refreshing Watermelon Margarita

via Watermelon Margarita — MSnubutterflies

Watermelon Margarita

Since Memorial Day weekend is almost upon us I thought I would share this recipe.  Whether you’re barbecuing with family and friends or relaxing at home it’s a perfect summer drink. Light, cool, and so refreshing! It’s my new favorite.

 

18 Quick Summer Snacks

by JaneMaynard via Cosmopolitan

Simple, delicious snacks and desserts in this easy to access website. Beat the summer heat while noshing on these wonderful delicacies. Yum!

53baef4e3a3ac_-_cos-02-summer-snacks-de

 

Sew Very Useful Neck Cooler (DIY)

by Beastbunny via Instructables

FQSXTDOF3R7AOBU.LARGE
The neck cooler in its dry, flat state before soaking in water.

Have a great summer!

What Most Doctors Don’t Know About Social Security Disability – And The SSA Doesn’t Tell You!

I had a follow-up doctor’s appointment a while back. I told him about the last two months health-wise, and brought him up-to-date with my most recent Social Security Disability Hearing and told him that it probably wasn’t looking good for me… Again. As usual, he couldn’t understand why I was still fighting; and then we continued on with my appointment.

doctor-patient-consultation

I was about to leave the room and something popped up in my head (I love how my brain works now). I stopped, and asked him if he ‘knew of a form I read about online that Social Security apparently wants from doctors. That for some (ridiculous) reason, the SSA doesn’t really give too much weight to short letters written from the doctor; but this “Residual Functioning Capacity” form (linked below) is pretty important… Apparently, it can be the deciding factor in some cases?’

I don’t think my brain said it as eloquently when I spoke, but luckily he understands me–even when I babble and slur.

It turned out though, that he didn’t really know anything about this form (he ‘thinks he heard of it’, he claimed, but asked me to send him a copy)! I can’t blame him for not really knowing about it honestly. A doctor’s word should matter to the courts when it comes to treating and supporting his or her patient–and Social Security should use any records or letters put into evidence, as long as they detail the diagnoses and note whether or not they consider the patient permanently disabled.

But if a doctor’s letter doesn’t entirely count as far as the SSA is concerned, why hasn’t this practice been changed?

0328eaa9-e829-4681-a268-1485280d3bd0_400_282

What concerns me is how many doctors don’t seem to know about this form (or how to file for Disability). They believe Social Security should take their word as gold that their patient is permanently disabled. But Social Security is basically stating, ‘Your letter and word as a physician isn’t enough, we want you to fill out an eight page form explaining, in detail, what their disability entails’.

With today’s technology, why can’t someone contact the doctor if they have any further questions (beyond the medical records)? Wouldn’t it be better to have a more personal account of a patient rather than make them fill out a detailed, “Can your patient lift 5/10/20 pounds on a regular basis – if so/not, please explain” form.

Instead, everyone’s fate rests on the hand of the SSA’s expert medical witness’ testimony (whom may or may not specialize in your illness(es)) by reading only the doctor’s notes–yet not hearing from the patient themselves. Therefore, they are basing their opinions on medical records that may or may not be detailed and complete.

Can you imagine the scores of people that keep getting denied Social Security and are constantly struggling, becoming homeless, and even dying because this ONE FORM wasn’t filled out by doctors–most likely because they didn’t know that it existed in the first place? (Note: When I tried finding it through the Social Security Website, I kept getting a “404 Error” message every time I tried to reach the page – It does exist though – see below for the link!).

PLEASE, everyone, SHARE this page! Tell your friends that are fighting, or about to start their fight, for their Disability benefits to print out the RFC form linked below–and make sure your doctor gets a copy. Have them share it with their colleagues!

Help stop this insanity!
PH

There’s so much I would have loved to have known when I became ill enough to be ultimately forced to apply for Disability. I truly hope that this helps someone so they don’t have to go through what I have… and still am because of poor medical treatment and recordkeeping.

I eventually began searching online, rather than the SSA website for the form, and finally found a copy that can be printed out HERE (pdf version). I’m hoping that doctors will start hearing more about the RFC form–and start helping their patients with disabilities win their Disability fight in a timely manner by filling it out.

I’m hoping even more that Social Security catch up to the times and realize that today’s doctors aren’t old school like Social Security still is (Come on, the system has barely changed since 1935–Over eighty years!). Doctors just don’t have time with the amount of patients they have to take care of today to fill out eight-page reports. Detailed notes (including via telephone) and detailed record keeping should be able to properly show a patient’s health status without question; while a patient’s testimony should be taken strongly into consideration–especially if a case lasts longer than five years.

No one should have to wait more than five years for their benefits.

Both the Social Security System and the medical industry need to create a simpler system that both can work with, so people that are truly disabled get their benefits in a more timely, and less stressful manner.

It is our money after all.

Until the laws get changed though, get that RFC form to your doctor’s office and ask them to fill it out along with your Disability application.

Good luck!!!

In case you missed it, click the link for access to the SSA’s RFC form: https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms/images/SSA4/G-SSA-4734-U8-1.pdf

Guilty Until Proven Innocent

UPDATE 12/2/16: My attorney dropped me with only two weeks before the deadline to file in Federal Court. We’re scrambling to find an attorney willing to take my case because of the state of limbo I am currently in. There’s a good chance I’m going to lose everything because of this. I haven’t given up, I just need to regroup and come up with a plan–quickly. Prayers are desperately needed.

UPDATE 10/28/16. Denied yet again by an ALJ. Appealed and SSA sided with the judge. Now I have to file a civil suit in Federal Court (again) to either have it remanded back to the SSA, overrule or (heaven forbid) side with the denial. The SSA still doesn’t know anything other than what they see on paper – and won’t seem to connect the difference between my past medical records and current ones – even though the symptoms have only worsened, never contradicted.

UPDATE 5/28/16: The decision for my Disability hearing came in, and I was denied again. I wasn’t surprised at all, albeit a bit let down. Of course, I appealed again.

Come back and visit to find out any future updates for my continuing fight for Disability.

2016 marks ten years since I first filed for Social Security Disability. I wish I could say that I’m the only one going through this fight that I never expected nor wanted to be in, but unfortunately I can’t. Too many people have gone broke, homeless and even died during their fight for their income… Too many others just give up the fight altogether, their lives ultimately ruined.

How incredibly insane is that? To have to fight so hard for something that you paid into your entire working life, only to be told “No”, over and over again when you need it the most!

I had my (technically) fourth hearing in front of an administrative law judgeSSDC-Denied.png a few weeks ago, and if I were a betting woman, I’d say my chances are pretty slim on being approved.

Again.

I’m hoping there’s a saving grace after that fiasco of a hearing… A last minute letter that my lawyer wrote to the judge pleading in my favor. Also, I recently went to the DMV and got a receipt that proved that I received a Permanent Disability Placard as early as August 2005 (they’d have to go to archives to get any older information). Some months before my alleged *Disability Date, and **Date Last Insured (DLI). A very nice representative there even signed and stamped it to make it as official as possible to try to help me <3.

I’m hoping that the above will help the judge realize that I was already considered disabled by my then-doctor, way before my listed Disability Date on my application.

Guilty until proven innocent. That’s what it feels like for me to fight my Social Security case. I think what offends me most is that the SSAguiltyinnocent thinks they know better about my disability (and inability to work) than my doctors and me. My last judge even observed an old manicure (that I had gotten with my daughter for her 16th birthday – my first in a couple of years), and it influenced his decision that I wasn’t depressed enough.

I can’t afford my own medical experts, because I haven’t worked since 2005 ($500+/hr is a little steep for a family with one income in California). Still, I don’t understand why I should even have to hire experts when I have letters from FIVE doctors, stating that I’m permanently disabled for one reason or another.

The most important letter in my mind though, was from an ex-doctor I had during the time in question (my Disability Date). I forced myself to call him a while back, after yet another denial from the judge. I explained to him that I finally got my diagnoses (of Multiple Sclerosis and Lupus and more) after leaving his office and the medical group. Then I mustered the nerve and asked him to write a letter to the judge on my behalf, and tell them whether or not he considered me disabled during that period. He agreed (even though the letter was pretty vague, he did tell the SSA that he considered me permanently disabled during the time in question).

Side Note: If you read about the history we had in the past, that was not an easy phone call for either of us to go through. But man, it felt so good for me to let him know that it wasn’t all in my head like he and his colleagues kept trying to push on me for so long! (To read more about that, go to Chronic Hell: My Story).

If you have never applied for Social Security (I truly hope you don’t have to until you retire), don’t get too cocky and think you’re going to win right away. I’m sorry, but it’s true. It just doesn’t happen as easily as that very often at all. Very few doctors know how to word their records for the SSA to easily determine Disability (If it did happen that way for you, congratulations! You are definitely one of the lucky few!).

Fraud-in-Dictionary.jpgI hear that the first few denials are to “weed out” the fraudulent cases. It takes months, even years to go through the appeal process after you do get denied; and then just as long to repeat it all over again. It’s a truly vicious process.

This all, of course, is also supposed to weed out those “frauds”.

I keep wondering how long you have to fight to prove that you aren’t a fraud. I’m really hoping ten (years) is my lucky number. I’m not getting any younger, and definitely not getting any healthier.

Even though I have a mountain of records that show that I had symptoms of all of my current diagnoses way before I became disabled; I had no big, “Hey, she’s a winner!” official diagnosis before my DLI that wowed the Social Security Administration enough to approve my application… Or so they try to claim (my first denial was because their examiner said I had a “social life” – I went to a few music concerts and high school football games, both seasonal at best).

Because my (ex)doctors didn’t really look too hard for what was wrong with me back then (and kept horrible records), their favorite go-to diagnosis for me was Depression. Man, that word ticked me off every time I heard one of them go back to that! Rather than actually take a test to see what was really going on with my actual symptoms, they kept referring to Depression. It’s the one big thing that I had back then that was documented enough to keep my case open though, so I have to keep hearing it.

Am I depressed?girl-1098611_960_720.jpg Of course I am (especially after dealing with so many bad apples in the medical profession, and of course, my fight with the SSA)! So many scary symptoms were happening to me that were basically ignored by my ex-doctors back then; and at home everything was getting turned upside down. No matter how many people were around me, I felt so alone; scared.

Even while I was sick with a case of Meningitis in the hospital in 2005, they still kept pushing Depression. Apparently, it didn’t help that I fired my doctor from my hospital bed. I guess you’re not allowed to make big decisions like that when you’re sick. If I was a litigious person, I would have sued them all for malpractice – Sometimes, I wish I would have.

All I ever wanted was to feel better again so I could get back to my life… I actually loved my work. I really miss running my own company, being my own boss – Something I worked really hard to become until my illness took it all away.

Most of all, I miss me.

I can only hope that this new judge can see through all the craziness in the form of my case (including the comments made to me by the last judge – I’m SO glad he retired last year!), and realize that there is so much more to this picture than there is on paper. I also hope that she’s compassionate enough to finally stop this part of my roller coaster ride.

I’ll find out the answer in about a month. Fingers crossed.


*Disability Date – The last day of actual work.
**Date Last Insured – The “date last insured” (DLI) is the last date that an individual is eligible to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). In order to receive SSDI, an individual must pass the “recent work” test. (from Google Search)

 

Prescription Commercial Propaganda

News Update (4/26/16): Biogen has announced that it will be taking down their Tecfidera Commercial. For full story, click here.

movies-at-home(Originally Posted 3/13/16) You’re sitting there, the kids are in bed, and the housework is finally done. You’re relaxing on your sofa enjoying a late night snack, while watching an episode of your favorite TV show. You are just about to find out whodunnit; your adrenaline is pumping and your eyes are glued to the screen. Then it happens.

A station break.

This one in particular happens to be about a medication that is offered to people living with Multiple Sclerosis. The commercial says the medication is made to cut relapses in half, while it shows a video of a woman that apparently has Multiple Sclerosis; smiling, hiking, swimming and even enjoying an evening at an amusement park. It all looks so wonderful, carefree, and happy! How fabulous it all seems to be.

Excuse me for saying so, but what a load of manure!

I’m not saying that the medication is bad. I’m not saying anything bad about any of the medications that have been made to treat the symptoms caused by Multiple Sclerosis. At least they are trying to find a cure.

My issue is that the person in the video is portrayed as a happy-go-lucky woman that is living with MS, and able to perform normal activities just like healthy people are easily able to do.

It’s nowhere near the truth for most people with MS in the real world! I think it’s disrespectful to people that live with Multiple Sclerosis, because it misleads the public into believing that something like this can magically happen for everyone living with the disease.

We wish that was truly the case!

While some people are able to have some benefits by taking some of these medications (MS medications in general, not one specific brand), not everyone responds to them as well as these ads claim. In fact, a lot of people don’t have many benefits from them at all, if any.

If you are someone that doesn’t live with MS (or any other type of chronic illness or disease), after seeing a commercial like this you would think that it was great that there’s a medication for people living with the condition, right? Have you ever actually listened to the commercial though? If not, you should. The next time you see that commercial (or any commercial advertising medications), listen to it very carefully (Or you can just watch the YouTube video I found for one of the commercial’s posted above).

The truth is, if pharmaceutical companies were to take a video of actual people living with Multiple Sclerosis (Lupus, Fibromyalgia and so many more disabling illnesses), you would see many of us using mobility and other assistive devices. You would see people that are fighting every day just to try to have a semblance of a normal life. You would see us saving our energy just so we could go someplace, like an amusement park… or maybe just the supermarket.

All of this while we are dutifully taking our medications.

But that wouldn’t make for a very good commercial, now would it?

 

Symptom of "Flushing"
Flushing symptom – A common side effect of the medication, Tecfidera.

 

Flushing2

 

Doctor Writes A Letter To Patients With A Chronic Illness

cropped-doctor_talking_with_a_patient.jpg

Why aren’t Medical Schools teaching a class on Doctor/Patient relationships and the insecurities and communications (and miscommunications) that happen between them?

I know it would have been a much more pleasant experience for me all those years, if a doctor would have had the guts to just say, “I’m sorry… I can’t help you. Please find a new doctor.”

It would have been so much easier than their favorite go-to, “Go see a psychiatrist”.

After the scores of “insecure” doctors I have been to over the years, I think I just might, thank you.

Click to read the letter, “A Letter To Patients With Chronic Disease“, by Dr. Rob Lamberts in his blog. He actually sounds like he gets it!

Feel Better Soon

feel better soon

When you live with a chronic illness you hear that all the time. “I hope you feel better soon”. While it’s a truly appreciated sentiment, it’s also a phrase that is hidden in plain site, showing how much most people truly aren’t aware of what it’s like to live with a chronic illness.

“Feel better soon” implies that someone has an illness or injury that they will eventually recover to their normal activities. A person living with a chronic illness doesn’t get to do that. We are living a constant loop of pain, sickness, and surprise symptoms to the point that we wish we literally and finally could just simply “feel better soon”.

I saw someone on Twitter speaking about the pain she was having due to an illness she was living with (Rheumatoid Arthritis). As I wrote my comment to her I was about to end with saying, “feel better soon”, when it hit me (well, I’ve thought it many times before, but this time it really hit me)… Instead of saying the norm, I should say what she and I are really hoping for. So instead I finished with, “I hope your pain lowers soon”.

When you live with a chronic illness, you know that unless you are one of the lucky few that go into full remission, the pain never completely goes away. That doesn’t even include the fatigue, cognitive issues, mobility issues and social isolation, financial stress, family stress; everything takes a bigger toll on the body of the majority of people living with a chronic illness or disease.

Even more so with invisible illness/diseases (An illness that a person lives with, but generally looks healthy to the naked eye). Even though there are people that are truly sick, it’s not unusual that they are treated with a more, “Come on, you can do it. Just try a little harder!” attitude. (cough) “A brother’s best friend’s aunt has the same thing, and they are doing just fine”. Little do they realize that there are different stages of chronic illness and diseases; and that no two people are alike when it comes to any given diagnosis.

Most people don’t even realize what it took to get the energy just to take a shower today.

Trust me when I say I’m as tough and stubborn as they come, and I have been through the wringer a few times over since I have been in “full chronic illness mode”. If someone says to me that they hurt too much or can’t do it anymore, that pretty much says it all in my book.

I still have dreams of getting my life back one day, so I can only imagine what it’s like for someone else.

If only we really could just feel better soon.

Doctors That Are Patients, Too

NeuronsAll too often, people that live with a chronic illness have a difficult time explaining to their doctor what their pain feels like; the fog, the numbness and tingling, the fatigue or whatever symptom they happen to be experiencing that week. We tend to become frustrated because we see the looks that a doctor gives us, most likely because our explanation doesn’t sound anything like they are described in medical school.

We as patients though were never taught how to properly describe a symptom; so basically going into an appointment can be like going to a convention where no one speaks the same language – which ultimately leads to nothing but confusion and frustration, and a lot of wasted time.

It’s extremely rare to find a doctor that understands exactly what we’re talking about. Unless, of course, they actually live with the symptoms we have been experiencing.

If you live with Multiple Sclerosis, you may have heard about a doctor named Terry Wahl, MD. She is the inventor of the “Wahls Protocol” (Amazon, Paperback $10.97), a diet she created to help stave off her symptoms of her progressive MS (which worked wonders for her), ultimately hoping to help others MSer’s do the same.

More recently, I have learned about Vincent F. Macaluso, MD. He is a neurologist that was diagnosed with MS while he was going to Medical School. Understandably, his specialty landed toward Multiple Sclerosis after school; and more recently he wrote a book called, “Multiple Sclerosis From Both Sides of the Desk” (Amazon, Paperback $24.73 USD)

Dr. Macaluso stated in an interview (below) that having MS influenced his practice, not only because he can relate to his patients in more personal manner, but also because he knows what alternative medications can be prescribed to help some of the symptoms. One of those medications, normally used for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), helped him finish his new book, because it was able to help him with the weak focus that is commonly found in patients with MS. In writing his book, Macaluso said he hopes to encourage clinical trials of similar drugs for MS, and spread awareness of the realities of MS patients among his colleagues, and MS patients and their families.

After hearing what Dr. Macaluso had to say in his interviews, I’m really looking forward to getting a copy of his book for myself so I can hear what else he has to say. Check out two of his interviews that are posted below:

  • Interview #1 – with Vincent F. Macaluso, MD; Credit to: Fox News Health

(Unfortunately, I was unable to embed this video, so please visit the link below to see the full interview with Dr. Macaluso on Fox News Health):

Fox News Health | Interview with Vincent F. Macaluso, MD

  • Interview #2 – with Vincent F. Macaluso, MD; Video credit to: Fox5NY 

If you do happen to get a copy of his book, come back and let me know what you thought… I’d love to hear your reviews!
Good reading!